The Matsutake Mushroom

Matsutake Mushroom

Among the wide variety of vegetation that grows within the King Range National Conservation Area lives the matsutake mushroom. It is native to North America, although it can be found most abundantly Washington, Oregon, and Northern California. (“Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest – Forest Products Permits,” n.d.). As far as physically identifying it, the matsutake is white in its earlier stages of life but then begins to turn brown as it ages. (“American Matsutake: Tricholoma magnivelare (MushroomExpert.Com),” n.d.). While it has unique rusty stains, the spicy odor of the mushroom is the prime identifier, and has been considered a delicacy by Japanese chefs. (“Wild About Mushrooms: Matsutake,” n.d.).  But in addition to physical attributes, the the matsutake mushroom is also unique in how it functions and interacts with other vegetation. It is a mycorrhizal fungi that partners up with the roots of selective tree species symbiotically so that both species benefit. (“BLM Mushroom Collecting at the King Range National Conservation Area | Bureau of Land Management,” n.d.). It receives its food in the form of carbohydrates and other sugars from the tree’s roots and then in return the tree receives water and other nutrients from the mushroom’s mycorrhizae. (“BLM Mushroom Collecting at the King Range National Conservation Area | Bureau of Land Management,” n.d.) Furthermore, This particular species of mushroom is edible and contains a high fiber content so it’s often harvested for personal use. (“BLM Mushroom Collecting at the King Range National Conservation Area | Bureau of Land Management,” n.d.). Because this mushroom is in such demand in this area, the Bureau of Land management had to establish several guidelines for the collection of these mushrooms. In order for them to be appropriately harvested, these mushrooms are supposed to be of a certain diameter, quantity, and even weight. There are also specific guidelines on how they should be harvested and what they should be used for once collected from this area. This mushroom is a treasured delicacy and a valuable asset to the environments in which it resides.

References

Retrieved from http://www.defeatdiabetes.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/food-matsutake-mushroom.jpg

The American Matsutake: Tricholoma magnivelare (MushroomExpert.Com). (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.mushroomexpert.com/tricholoma_magnivelare.html

BLM Mushroom Collecting at the King Range National Conservation Area | Bureau of Land Management. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/arcata/kingrange/mushroom_collecting.html

Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest – Forest Products Permits. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/rogue-siskiyou/passes-permits/forestproducts/?cid=stelprdb5329343

Wild About Mushrooms: Matsutake. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.mssf.org/cookbook/matsutake.html

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The Matsutake Mushroom

2 thoughts on “The Matsutake Mushroom

  1. Braden Morrison says:

    Although my sister told me I had to do this for her, I did think it was kind of cool. I liked learning how the trees and the mushrooms worked together.

    Like

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