Reasons of Protection

King Range National Conservation Area, a 68,000+ acre, mountainous region across the coast of California, was first put under protection by the United States government through congressional action on October 21 in the year 1970. (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.)The land to this day is still being protected by the government because of its unique features and value to the public. Spanning 35 miles across the coast of California, King Range NCA offers quite the variety of attractions to the public. (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.) Its coast provides beaches for people to visit and within the sheer amount of acreage the area offers there are many mountains and forests for hikers, bikers, and tourists to explore. (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.) Within the vast mountain ranges and forests lie many ecosystems as well. These ecosystems are the other reason why King Range NCA was put under protection in 1970 and is still being protected to this day. King Range NCA is primarily known for its diverse bird population but because of that its also intriguing plant population is often ignored. (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.) There is plant life covering the whole area the most notable of the plants being firs, bear grass, and poison oak. There is also a wide variety of mushrooms  within the reserve. (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.) The fir trees cover a lot of the mountainous regions of the conservation area and the other plants are skewed about the area where people are usually able to observe them due to the plentiful amount of campsites set up around the park. Tourists/campers are allowed to look but not disrupt any of the nature or else they will be fined. (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.) The only time it is okay for people to take things out of the environment is if they have a permit to do so (for example it is ok for someone to take mushrooms out of the environment if they have a mushroom collecting permit). (“Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas!”,n.d.) It’s because of the beautiful environment and the endless amounts of utility that the King Range NCA has to offer to the general public that the United States government has protected and continues to protect this monumental plot of land.

Capture

Citations:

  1. Justin Robbins. Upland views from the Rattlesnake Ridge (2015, March 6). Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/blmcalifornia/16285803604/in/album-72157651516701341/
  2. Amy Krause. Discover California’s Lost Coast: black-sand beaches, steep and rugged mountains, and incredibly scenic vistas! Retrieved from: http://www.recreation.gov/marketing.do?goto=acm/Explore_And_More/exploreArticles/Spotlight__King_Range_National_Conservation_Area.htm
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Reasons of Protection

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